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is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
hillary clinton is in cairo this morning working to make that peace happen. can egypt help bring an end to the fighting? and back at home, all eyes on the white house for a thanksgiving tradition. the presidential turkey pardon. get ready to gobble up the history of this bird watch. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 21st, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert filling in for the great chuck todd. a commuter bus exploded in central tel aviv injuring at least 19 people steps away from the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in the region and interfashionly. >> chuck joins us now from cambodia where he is traveling with the president. chuck, a lot of moving and fast moving parts here. what can you tell us? what's the latest? >> i can tell you what aides will say in answer it to that question off answer. certain things you can say on camera
of regional stability and peace. >> we start with nbc's jim macedo in cairo. who what are the details? >> reporter: well, steve, most importantly, starting at 2:00 p.m. as you mentioned israel stops all military action in israel and hamas stops launching rockets on israel and carrying out border attacks on israeli troops but this is the key thing. there is no signed formal agreement here. instead, israel and hamas reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet. the first phase of a broader agreement. that should be followed by more intense negotiations, those will be anchored and guaranteed we understand by egypt and the united states. to try to resolve the key demands on both sides. of course, for hamas, the lifting of that 6-year-old blockade of gaza. for israel, it's stopping all the weapons smuggling. but neither will happen immediately. at least, however, they have agreed in principle to these demands and the need to work them out. you had a clip of secretary clinton. she went on to call the cease-fire deal a step in the right direction. she said she looks forwar
in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a very important role in this. it can exert a tremendous amount of leverage on the israelis to avoid a ground invasion of the gaza strip. while the u.s. does believe that israel has a right too defend its
me from cairo, nbc news correspondent jim maceda. jim, explain to all of us the reaction to secretary clinton's visit to the region and the impact that her presence has brought to the negotiations for a cease-fire. >> reporter: first, the reaction has been one of anxiety, anticipation, and of deep hope that secretary of state hillary clinton can now broker or help to broke err deal. they certainly don't want war right next door. many are asking where america has been for these past eight or so years. i think the overall feeling is one of anticipation, that something hopefully now can move forward. in terms of her impact today, she's met already with president morsi. she's also wrapping up a meeting with the foreign minister and we understand at the press conference she's supposed to give has not started yet. but i can guarantee you that many people here in egypt and israel are intent on following that press conference. unlike yesterday, there have been no dramatic statements that a cease-fire will be declared at such and such a time. today it's more the reality of both sides, israel a
to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it starte
in jerusalem. palestinian authorities in ramallah and later travel to cairo where officials are said to be proposing for a truce. >>> egyptian president mohamed morsi is seen as a critical player. he met yesterday with u.n. secretary ban ki-moon. turkey's prime minister complicated matters when he reefr referred to israel as a terrorist state after attending talks in egypt. president obama spoke by phone yesterday to both morsi and netanyahu during his trip to southeast asia. in gaza hamas is calling for israel to stop killing its leaders and end a six-year blockade. meanwhile, new explosions continued through palestinian territory. they say they targeted the national islamic bank which they accuse hamas of using to pay its employees. an nbc analysis found israel has killed nearly 40 hamas militants over the last week, often using high precision drone strikes but the civilian toll has been high as well. thousands of people turned out for the funerals of four young children killed in an israeli air strike. meanwhile, israel's so-called iron dome missile defense has helped keep most mi
are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense of euphoria. there's going to be hangover when the dust settles when they bury the dead and count the costs, there ought to be as there was after cass led in 2008-2009, a clear contrast with a much better situ
, by the time it was getting ready to announce it in cairo, there was a great sense of anxiety that, in fact, the truce slipped out of the party's reach because we woke up on tuesday morning, yesterday morning, with a great sense of optimism there will be a cease-fire. by last night, it looked like it was out of reach and a great sense of desperation this morning. in fact, almost a spike of overnight killings. the death toll 146. 34 in one day's count and people this morning were waking up to very different feelings than they were yesterday. soldiers on the border. people very much afraid of a ground invasion. perhaps it was thedy ploy sy of secretary clinton to salvage this. they're not out of woods to use that expression but no sense that this evening will be a lot or at least relatively calmer than it was over the past eight nights. >> coming to the cease-fire and the agreement that was made, what are the conditions that hamas was willing to bring to the table to negotiate with? >> reporter: well, hamas is willing -- hamas and the palestinian factions part of it willing to stop all rocket
in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tragedy. that means hamas might be able to spin this into a long term political benefit for themselves. >> the counter argument to what i made is would you rather live in gaza or the west bank. >> it's still the west bank, bu
down with egypt's president in cairo. we'll be following that as well. >>> all right. coming up on "morning joe" -- former national security adviser dr. brzezinski. hardball's chris mathews, dan senor back on the show, and actor john o'hurley will be here with two special guests to preview thursday's popular national dog show. up next, mike allen with this morning's politico playbook. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good wednesday pomonk to you. busy travel day. the last thing we needed was a large area of the country with heavy fog. i expect significant problems in the midwest. the northeast, clouds are moving out, just like yesterday in many areas. no travel concerns whatsoever for all of the busy i-95 cities. airports are off to a good start and they should remain that way during the day. of course be there can be some volume issues because of so many people. that's about it. nice forecast and the winds should remain light. your flight should be a relatively uneventful flight in the eastern seaboard. to the problem area, areas of gray, dense fog adviso
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14